Filtering With Buffers

    Filtering with buffers is a powerful way to perform analysis on your datasets.  For example, you can set up criteria to show only locations from Dataset A that fall within [x] miles of Dataset B.  Now plug your use case in that example… I want to see prospects within 10 miles of my sales reps […]

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    Filter Records Near an Address

    SpatialKey offers filtering based on proximity to a specified address.  To set this up, simply add a custom circle shape to your map by adding a new Shape Layer.  Click the  icon in the Layer Manager, then select Custom Shapes. Select to add a Circle.  Move shapes around the map by dragging the bar at the top […]

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    Synchronizing Filters Across Datasets

    Use synchronized filters to filter multiple datasets with a single filter pod.  Synchronized filters work in dashboards where multiple datasets have been added.  Once a synchronization is set up, any filters applied to the selected dataset/column combination will also be applied to all other synchronized datasets. Each dataset that is synchronized for filtering must have a […]

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    Compare the Distribution of Filtered and Unfiltered Data

    SpatialKey allows you to see the impact that filters have on an attribute of your data by showing the filtered and unfiltered distributions in the same view.  Both of the following images show the distribution of square footage of properties sold in a real estate transaction dataset, filtered to only show condo properties.  In the […]

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    Using Fields From a Joined Dataset

    One of the many ways to filter your data is to filter based on a joined field.  Maybe you joined two point datasets together to enhance them with each other’s fields; or maybe you joined your point dataset with a shapefile in order to see which of your points fall within the shape boundaries.  Whatever the reason […]

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    Comparison Maps – Two Datasets

    This video will walk you through setting up a comparison map for two datasets with details around selecting and configuring your data, selecting the best map rendering option, and how to interpret what the map is telling you.  For additional examples of using comparison maps with single datasets, check out the prequel video here.

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    Using Multiple Maps in Blank Canvas

    The Blank Canvas app is a powerful way to completely customize your dashboard from scratch!  You can add pods just like in other apps, but in Blank Canvas you have the added flexibility to add multiple individual maps to be viewed side by side. Let’s walk through steps to get multiple maps in Blank Canvas. […]

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    Visual Map Layers

    Web Map Service (WMS) is a widely supported format for integrating imagery into mapping applications.  With the addition of WMS in Spatialkey you can overlay imagery on top of the existing map tiles or use a WMS layer as your backdrop instead of using the provided MapQuest map tiles.  Many third parties provide WMS imagery […]

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    Summarize Data With the Unique Value List

    SpatialKey’s Unique Value List pod provides a list of all unique values for fields in your dataset.  Add a unique value list pod from the dataset configuration panel.  Select a column to group your data by as well as a numeric value for the calculation. Click to “add pod” when you are done configuring. With […]

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    Detect Time of Day Trends

    SpatialKey’s Temporal Heat Index pod summarizes your data by time of day (columns) and day of week (rows).  Each cell represents a specific day of week and hour of day combination, like “Thursdays at 4pm”.  This component makes it easy to spot temporal trends in your data.  Like other SpatialKey pods, the Temporal Heat Index […]

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